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Competition and Jealousy

4 Sep 2016   Shanti Gowans
 
Many people believe that competition is good for business, especially for the consumer.  They claim that competition keeps a business or person on their best behaviour with the result being the best for all concerned. Here competition is defined as a contest between two rivals and the effort of two or more parties to secure the business of a third party by offering the most favourable terms. Additionally, it keeps the other person from gaining an unfair advantage as they continue to compete for more business or whatever favour that is sought. 

Competition has long been responsible for survival of the fittest in the jungle. Competition starts with us at a very early age, and we experience it throughout our entire life. We get our first taste of competition as a baby when we compete for exclusive attention from our mother. This continues as we grow older and compete for recognition from our siblings or classmates. In another era, early on in school, we were encouraged to win and be the best. It exists to choose who gets the prize when the prize can't be shared.
 
However, as human beings we no longer need to function by laws of the jungle. we can function from a new paradigm that extends beyond 'survival of the fittest' competitive paradigmof business, as we are much more aligned with cosmic laws. Now, many schools are teaching it is better to play a good game and not so important to win or be the best. Which is better could make for a long debate. 

It’s difficult to be competitive without being jealous. Jealous is defined as being intolerant of rivalry and vigilant in guarding a possession. The dictionary also describes being jealous as distrustfully watchful and suspicious.  Some of these qualities are not ones we want to cultivate, especially when as we become competitive and jealous, we learn to believe that another person’s success lessens our own.  
 
In business we want that exclusive contract with XYZ Company; as a person we demand exclusive love from our mate; as a neighbour we may want a bigger house and a fancier car.  
 
 Can competition be advantageous if it renders us jealous and possessive?

We must think of the world as abundantly filled with enough for everyone.  If we don’t have as much as our business associates and neighbours we should be happy for their success and help them achieve more if possible. It is impossible to help others achieve without helping ourselves at the same time. 

We are all born with our personal talents and there are others who have talents we will never possess.  We will probably never win an Olympic gold medal but we can be happy for those who do.  We enjoy their accomplishments vicariously.  Many people watch athletic events and cheer on their team and celebrate their victory. We must do this in everyday life as well. 

Learn from those who are better than you and improve. Surround yourself with happy successful people and you will be happy and successful too.  
 
The ultimate victory in competition is derived from the inner satisfaction of knowing that you have done your best and that you have achieved the most out of what you had to give. If you lose something after you have done all you can to keep or gain it, then be happy for whoever gained it.  This may not be easy, but neither is life. Strive not to be in competition and jealous of everyone but to work with everyone to achieve a common goal.  

With being more accountable to ourselves we create our own 'luck'. In this way, winning at anything can be seen as a aspect of being accountable to yourself. Learn to be inspired with success whether it’s yours or anothers.  Strive to be the best but eschew jealousy.  
 
Enjoy life and each day in it. Do not allow your ego to get in the way of a life filled with happiness. You are part of the world as a whole. Fill it the best you can. 
 

 

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About Shantiji

Shanti Gowans is the globally recognised author and founder of Shanti Yoga™, Meditation and Ayurveda for the self, family and community.

Shantiji has brought the concepts and practices of a healthy body and a still mind to thousands of Australians through her Yoga and Meditation programs on national television... Read more about Shantiji's biography


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